Greater Las Vegas Association of REALTORS®

Breaking News on New Version

Residential Purchase Agreement

From the GLVAR: http://www.lasvegasrealtor.com/

“The 2013 Forms Committee worked hard to provide GLVAR Members forms that comply with NV Law. Please find below revisions on the Residential Purchase Agreement (RPA), Supplemental Property Disclosure Form, and see information on the new FIRPTA Affidavit form. If you have any questions please email the Forms Committee at forms@glvar.org.

“Due to a formatting error the initial section on pages 2-11 of the Residential Purchase Agreement have been omitted. While zipForm fixes the issue we suggest that Members have both parties initial each page even if there is no pre-printed area.”

Residential Purchase Agreement (RPA):

  1. P.      2 – Section 2(A) removed the line regarding ordering of an appraisal.
  2. P.      3 – Section 5(E) moved and redrafted the FIRPTA compliance provision, the      updated language is now on pg. 13.
  3. P.      3 – Section 6- revised the title insurance language as requested by the      SNEA.
  4. P.      3 – Section 70 moved the trash services fee provision from subsection B to      subsection A and added phrase “to be paid current through COE.”
  5. P.      7 – Removed the Licensee Disclosure of Interest provision as it is a      duplicate provision and is addressed on p. 12.
  6. P.      8 – Section 18 (A) added language required by recent changes in Nevada law      regarding arbitration and mediation provisions.
  7. P.      12 – Revamped the Buyer’s Acknowledgement of Offer provision.
  8. P.      13 – Revamped the Seller’s Response and included FIRPTA language.
  9. Various      editing and grammatical changes.”

Seller Financing Will Change Nationwide in 2014

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Seller Financing and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act  (“Dodd Frank”)

The Dodd-Frank Seller financing regulations go into effect January 2014.  There are two exceptions:

  1. Natural Person and not more than 1 residential loan per year meeting all requirements below.
  2. Person or Entity no more than three residential loans in any 12-month period (not necessarily from January to December) meeting all requirements below.

Natural Person – 1 Property

Check List

(read the actual Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (“CFPB”) Rules by clicking here, go to page 20.)

  1. You provide seller financing for only one property in any 12-month period.
  2. You owned the property securing the financing.
  3. You did not construct, or act as a contractor for the construction of, a residence on the property in your ordinary course of business.
  4. Your financing does not result in negative amortization.
  5. Your financing has a fixed rate or does not adjust for the first five years.

Person or Corporation – 3-Property

Check List

(read the actual Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (“CFPB”) Rules by clicking here, go to page 21.)

  1. You provide seller financing for three or fewer residential properties in any 12-month period.
  2. You owned the properties securing the financings.
  3. You did not construct, or act as a contractor for the construction of the property.
  4. Your financing is fully amortized.
  5. Your financing has a fixed rate or does not adjust for the first five years; and
  6. The seller has determined that the borrower has the reasonable ability to repay the loan according to its terms per 12 CFR § 1026.43(c). The CFPB states you may use the criteria set forth in § 1026.43(c) or comment 36(a)(4)-1 to comply with the ability-to-repay standard.  (This could include considering earnings as evidenced by payroll or earning statements, W-2s, etc.; other income from a federal, state, or local agency providing benefits and entitlements; and/or income earned from assets (such as financial assets or rental property. The value of the dwelling may not be considered as evidence of the buyer’s ability to repay See in general, The Daily Journal of the United States Government Loan Originator Compensation Requirements Under the Truth in Lending Act (Regulation Z)

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  On May 13, 2013 I wrote to you about the Nevada Homeowner’s Bill of Rights.  The link is here.

Short Sale – “Dual Tracking” and the Homeowner’s Bill of Rights in Nevada May 2013

Tomorrow October 1, 2013 it becomes law.  You can review the law by clicking the post above. As a reminder here are some bullet points that affect sales:

TO WHOM DOES IT NOT APPLY, YOU ASK?

(a)    Notice that these additional restrictions apply only to a notice of default and election to sell which is recorded on or after October 1, 2013.

(b)   Lenders with less than 100 foreclosures per year, are exempt.

(c)    A lender that complies with United States of America et al. v. Bank of America Corporation et al., is exempt from these provisions.

UNIQUE EFFECTS OF THE  LAW

Duel Tracking Prohibited.  Prohibits the lender  from continuing the foreclosure process while an application for a foreclosure prevention alternative is pending (short sale). (Section 13).

Arm’s Length Not Required. Sec. 16.5. declares a short sale cannot be denied based upon the . No provision of the laws of this State may be “non arm’s length,” in other words, if you relative buys the property, that cannot be the reason for lender denial.  This is big point, the exact language if a lender asks for it is “Sec. 16.5. 1. No provision of the laws of this State may be construed to require a sale in lieu of a foreclosure sale to be an arm’s length transaction or to prohibit a sale in lieu of a foreclosure sale that is not an arm’s length transaction.” That’s found on page 17 of Nevada Senate Bill 321.

Single Point of Contact. The Lender must provide a single point of contact for a borrower who requests a foreclosure prevention alternative (short sale).

Notice of Information. At least 30 calendar days before recording a notice of default and election to sell and at least 30 calendar days after the borrower’s default, the lender must provide to the borrower information concerning the borrower’s account, the foreclosure prevention alternatives offered by the lender and a statement of the facts supporting the right of the mortgagee or beneficiary to foreclose.

Rescission of Notice of Default.  Any notice of default and election to sell recorded must be rescinded, and any pending foreclosure sale must be cancelled, if:

(a)    The borrower accepts a permanent loan modification

(b)   A notice of sale is not recorded within 9 months after the notice of default and election to sell is recorded

(c)    A foreclosure sale is not conducted within 90 calendar days after a notice of sale is recorded.

Did you catch that? A foreclosure has to start over, including new recording of notice of default, if the foreclosure does not take place if 1.) a notice of sale is not recorded 90 days after the notice of default and then the next deadline is 2.) if the foreclosure does not take place 90 days after the notice of sale.  That will be interesting.

$50,000 Penalty. If a Court finds a lender in violation of this law, the Court can order and award to the borrower the greater of treble actual damages or statutory damages of $50,000.

Alright, that should make it fun until Christmas 2013 at least.

OTHER SHORT SALE POSTS

7 Tips for Short Sale

Addendum to Short Sale Listing 1.26.2010

Advance Fees Continued and the FTC 1.6.2011

Advance Fees – Short Sales – FTC II 5.4.2011

Charging for negotiating short sales/Negotiators 10.1.2010

Deficiency Judgments Nevada 4.27.2007

Foreclosure and the One Action Rule in Nevada 4.10.2007

HAMP the Federal Shortsale Program coming April 2010

HUD Suspends Pending Dual Agency Limitation – Short Sales 9.26.2013

Income Taxes & Foreclosures/Shortsales 12.21.2007

Income Taxes & Foreclosure/Short Sales 2013 Update

IRS PUBLICATIONS shortsales/foreclosures:

Ten Facts about Mortgage Debt Forgiveness

IRS publication on how 1099 taxes are calculated, exempt, etc.

IRS explanation as to taxes resulting from Foreclosure and Debt Cancellation.

Judicial Foreclosures (Short sales are looking more attractive..) 3.23.2012

Lender Short Sale Approval Addendum

Nevada Supreme Court Mandatory Mediation Program and How it Affects Shortsale

Nevada Short Sale Documents

Seller Being Released From Liability Language in Shortsale

Seller Liability After Short Sale 4.20.2007

Short Sale Advanced Fees

Short Sale Addendum to Purchase Agreement October 2010

Short Sales and Bankruptcy and Waiting Periods 10.5.2012

Short Sale Junior Lien/Senior Liens Rights To Sue & Other Changes

Short Sale Wallet Size Answer Sheet

Questions? email me darren@dwelshlaw.com

ImageMany of you have heard that short sales were going to be limited so that the buyer’s and seller’s agent could not be from the same brokerage.  The new rule was effective October 1, 2013.

You can read the July 9, 2013 Mortgagee Letter (#2013-23) from HUD here.

The latest news from the National Association of REALTORS(r) is that as of yesterday September 25, 2013 HUD officials reported that they would reissue the July Mortgagee Letter (#2013-23) and remove all dual agency language.  The issue is not completed,  but the  dual agency policy will not be implemented on Oct. 1.

Open Road   I received a text on May 31, 2013; if accelerator clauses are legal, a good idea? etc.  That’s funny, I had the same question posed to me, only not by text, years ago.  Here is what I said in 2004, as in 9 years ago.  Remember 2004?

Accelerator Clauses

   Accelerator clauses are appearing in buyers’ offers.  “Buyer will pay $___ over any other offer better than theirs.  Seller must provide Buyers copy of better offer.”  Selling agents are declaring that this should ‘guarantee’ a buyer to be in first position.  Listing agents are interested in accepting these clauses to ensure the highest price in a bidding war.  There are forms and clauses being exchanged.

The issue is the meaning of the clause and what terms are being accepted.  The lower offer may have different financing, closing costs, escrow dates, lease backs, repair request, etc. Thus when the clause is triggered….it renders, potentially, another purchase agreement in first position. But is that in a seller’s best interest? What other terms differ between the former highest bid and now the Accelerator Clause triggered bid?

In a recent scenario a listing agent entertained 4 offers, all different prices, close dates, finances, closing costs and different styles of buyer.  The buyers varied from investor group, independent flipper, and first time buyer. If the Seller accepts the accelerator clause of one of the buyers, what does it mean?  Does a buyer now have to change their terms of financing to meet another offer?  As to financing, this will not necessarily work. Does the Buyer have to close earlier or later?  There is little meeting of the minds as to most aspects of the sale, all very important aspects, other than the purchase price.

By accepting the ‘accelerator clause’ the Seller may loses their ability to choose what they feel is the ‘best offer.’  From a seller’s perspective, did they get enough? What if a seller does not accept the Clause and counters All Parties for a highest and best to be ‘reconfirmed,’ by the Seller.  From a buyer’s perspective you have agreed to a higher price, was the other offer even feasible? Assuming it is valid, was it a possible offer? Was the other buyer not concerned about the price due to an appraisal contingency?  Does the Clause Buyer have that protection?.  The now accepted offer triggered by the Clause may or may not be subject to appraisal.

The accelerator clause does not solve much.  It is attractive because it gives hope. The Accelerator Clause is a cousin to the lease option in the family of bad ideas.  In all markets, it is not just price.

  Darren Welsh, 2004

So, that was my opinion in 2004.  Not much has changed.  Except, as fair warning, the Nevada Real Estate disagrees with Accelerator Clauses for different reasons.  In the 2012 Third Edition Nevada Law And Reference Guide, p. 86 (§A(4)(c)) the NRED hints Accelerator Clauses may not be fair dealing.

“Acceleration” Clauses (not what you think!) – The Division has stated it is a violation of fair dealing to insert what it identifies as an “acceleration” clause. This is not the “acceleration clause” found in general contract or financing law. According to the Division, an acceleration clause is a clause in which the offeror promises to pay a certain set amount above the highest offered sale price and usually provides for a maximum or cap amount. The Division’s example is, “I will pay $2,000 over the highest offer up to $300,000.” This type of clause automatically gives one offeror a stated advantage over other offerors and may not allow fair dealing for the other offerors.”

“Though the previous two activities (disclosing offer terms and inserting an acceleration clause) are not a direct violation of any law or regulation, and there is some controversy regarding this, nevertheless, the Real Estate Commission has found these practices to be highly suspect.”

O.K.…per NRED, they are are not an outright violation, but apparently frowned upon as it gives one buyer a “stated advantage.” Clear as mud. I am not sure where the NRED is going with that, considering the fact that merely offering a higher sales price is a stated advantage.  Nonetheless yet another reason the clauses are problematic.

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Web’s Chicken Coop

“Short Sale – Dual Tracking” during residential foreclosure is where the lender pursues foreclosure AND other loan modifications (short sales) simultaneously.

SB 321 has passed and is set to be signed by the Nevada Governor.

It affects foreclosure both statutory and judicial of owner-occupied property; providing civil remedies for failure to comply with certain provisions.  It extends the foreclosure mediation process to judicial foreclosures.

It is complicated and mostly concerns actions leading up to foreclosure.

However, for re-sales, likely the most important is the elimination of the practice commonly known as “dual-tracking” by prohibiting the continuation of the foreclosure process while an application for a foreclosure prevention alternative is pending or while the borrower is current on his or her obligation under a foreclosure prevention alternative.  So, for example, if the owner enters into an arrangement with the lender, a foreclosure prevention alternative, which could arguably include a short sale, the lender is prohibited from continuing the foreclosure process until such time as the foreclosure prevention alternative is ended. This may end the surprise foreclosures the day before short sale close of escrow.

Read the whole bill here:  SB 321

Here is the Nevada Legislative Counsel’s Digest:

  Under existing law, the trustee under a deed of trust concerning owneroccupied housing has the power to sell the property to which the deed of trust applies, subject to certain restrictions. (NRS 107.080, 107.085, 107.086) Existing law also provides for a judicial foreclosure action under certain circumstances for the recovery of any debt or for the enforcement of any right secured by a mortgage or other lien upon real estate. (NRS 40.430)

  Sections 2-16 of this bill establish additional requirements for the foreclosure of owner-occupied housing securing a residential mortgage loan.

  Under section 7.5 of this bill, these additional restrictions do not apply to a financial institution that, during its immediately preceding annual reporting period, as established with its primary regulator, has foreclosed on 100 or fewer owner-occupied homes located in this State.

  Under section 30 of this bill, these additional restrictions apply only to a notice of default and election to sell which is recorded on or after October 1, 2013.

  Section 10 of this bill provides that at least 30 calendar days before recording a notice of default and election to sell or commencing a judicial foreclosure action and at least 30 calendar days after the borrower’s default, the mortgage servicer, mortgagee or beneficiary of the deed of trust must provide to the borrower certain information concerning the borrower’s account, the foreclosure prevention alternatives offered by the mortgage servicer, mortgagee or beneficiary and a statement of the facts supporting the right of the mortgagee or beneficiary to foreclose.

  Section 11 of this bill prohibits the recording of a notice of default and election to sell or the commencement of a judicial foreclosure action involving a failure to make payment until the mortgage servicer complies with certain requirements regarding contact with, or attempts to contact, the borrower.        Section 13 of this bill prohibits the practice commonly known as “dual-tracking” by prohibiting a mortgage servicer, trustee, mortgagee or beneficiary of a deed of trust from continuing the foreclosure process while an application for a foreclosure prevention alternative is pending or while the borrower is current on his or her obligation under a foreclosure prevention alternative.

  Section 14 of this bill requires a mortgage servicer to provide a single point of contact for a borrower who requests a foreclosure prevention alternative.

  Section 15 of this bill requires that under certain circumstances, a mortgage servicer, mortgagee or beneficiary of a deed of trust must dismiss a judicial foreclosure action or rescind a recorded notice  – 2 – – of default and election or notice of sale.

  Section 16 of this bill provides for certain civil remedies for a material violation of the provisions of sections 2-16.

  Section 16 also provides that a signatory to the consent judgment entered in the case entitled United States of America et al. v. Bank of America Corporation et al., who complies with the Settlement Term Sheet under that judgment is deemed to be in compliance with sections 2-16 and is not liable for a violation of those provisions.

  Section 16 further provides that if the consent judgment is modified or amended to permit compliance with the Final Servicing Rules issued by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to supersede the terms of the Settlement Term Sheet under the consent judgment: (1) a signatory to the consent judgment who complies with the modified or amended Settlement Term Sheet while the consent judgment is in effect is deemed to be in compliance with sections 2-16 and is not liable for a violation of those provisions; and (2) any mortgage servicer, mortgagee or beneficiary of the deed of trust who complies with the Final Servicing Rules is deemed to be in compliance with sections 2-16 and is not liable for a violation of those provisions.

  Section 18 of this bill provides that in a judicial foreclosure action concerning owner-occupied property, the mortgagor may elect to participate in the Foreclosure Mediation Program.

OTHER SHORT SALE POSTS

7 Tips for Short Sale

Addendum to Short Sale Listing 1.26.2010

Advance Fees Continued and the FTC 1.6.2011

Advance Fees – Short Sales – FTC II 5.4.2011

Charging for negotiating short sales/Negotiators 10.1.2010

Deficiency Judgments Nevada 4.27.2007

Foreclosure and the One Action Rule in Nevada 4.10.2007

HAMP the Federal Shortsale Program coming April 2010

Income Taxes & Foreclosures/Shortsales 12.21.2007

Income Taxes & Foreclosure/Short Sales 2013 Update

IRS PUBLICATIONS shortsales/foreclosures:

Ten Facts about Mortgage Debt Forgiveness

IRS publication on how 1099 taxes are calculated, exempt, etc.

IRS explanation as to taxes resulting from Foreclosure and Debt Cancellation.

Judicial Foreclosures (Short sales are looking more attractive..) 3.23.2012

Lender Short Sale Approval Addendum

Nevada Supreme Court Mandatory Mediation Program and How it Affects Shortsale

Nevada Short Sale Documents

Seller Being Released From Liability Language in Shortsale

Seller Liability After Short Sale 4.20.2007

Short Sale Advanced Fees

Short Sale Addendum to Purchase Agreement October 2010

Short Sales and Bankruptcy and Waiting Periods 10.5.2012

Short Sale Junior Lien/Senior Liens Rights To Sue & Other Changes

Short Sale Wallet Size Answer Sheet

Questions? email me darren@dwelshlaw.com

Scotland 2013

Scotland 2013

Recently the Nevada State Contractor’s Board and real estate agents in Nevada have debated whether or not a real estate broker can ‘order’ a repair of a part of real property during a listing period. If that order is in the name of the agent is that agent performing duties of a licensed contractor? This is NRS 645 vs. NRS 624. My position was that such a task is in line with the servicing of a listing and should be exempt from the control of the Nevada State Contractor’s Board as falls under the licensed activities of NRS 645.030.

NRS 624 has been modified…and upon its signing by the Governor of Nevada very soon, the is now clear that such activity by a real estate agent is exempt, provided the work does not require a building permit and does not exceed $10,000.

Below is the relevant text – or you can read it the entire AB334  here http://www.leg.state.nv.us/session/77th2013/reports/history.cfm?id=758

 11. A person licensed as a real estate broker, real estate broker-salesperson or real estate salesperson pursuant to chapter 645 of NRS who, acting within the scope of the license or a permit to engage in property management issued pursuant to NRS 645.6052, assists a client in scheduling work to repair or maintain residential property pursuant to a written brokerage agreement or a property management agreement. Such assistance includes, without limitation, assisting a client in the hiring of any number of licensed contractors to perform the work. Nothing in this subsection authorizes the performance of any work for which a license is required pursuant to this chapter by a person who is not licensed pursuant to this chapter or the payment of any additional compensation to a person licensed as a real estate broker, real estate broker-salesperson or real estate salesperson for assisting a client in scheduling the work. The provisions of this subsection apply only if a building permit is not required to perform the work and if the value of the work does not exceed $10,000 per residential property during the fixed term of the written brokerage agreement, if the assistance is provided pursuant to such an agreement, or during a period not to exceed 6 months if the assistance is provided pursuant to a property management

agreement. As used in this subsection:

 (a) “Brokerage agreement” has the meaning ascribed to it in NRS 645.005.

 (b) “Property management agreement” has the meaning ascribed to it in NRS 645.0192.

 (c) “Real estate broker” has the meaning ascribed to it in NRS 645.030.

 (d) “Real estate broker-salesperson” has the meaning ascribed to it in NRS 645.035.

 (e) “Real estate salesperson” has the meaning ascribed to it in NRS 645.040.

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